Red Creek In New York State

Red Creek In New York State

If you follow the Red Creek to be found in New York State you will end up in Seneca County. This county comprises a large area with a population around 35, 251. With its primary seat located in Waterloo, the county has several administrative centers as well. Its geographical uniqueness comes from Seneca Falls which is how the county derived its name, as well as the Rochester-Seneca-Batavia, falls.

Red Creek In New York State

The county was established around 1683 by the European settlers who came here. Located in the northern part of the state, it is a large area that the county encompasses. The area’s history is interesting which comprises of how George Washington led his troops in the Sullivan expedition as well as the Revolutionary War. During such times much of Seneca and Cayuga villages were destroyed. By the nineteenth century, the county area was reduced in size and part of its area was moved to Cayuga County. The county has several distinct areas such as the Finger Lakes region, areas surrounding the Seneca Lake and Cayuga Lake. The Finger Lakes national forest lies in the southern part of the county. Another natural landmark here is the Sampson state park.

The Wayne County is another area by the Red Creek in New York State. Here there are villages to stop by at and check out the creek waters that flow by. The settlers in Wayne County came around 1811; the creek was named so due to the red color that it had. Some state that the iron ore deposits under its watery bed gave it the distinct shade; others say that tanneries located in the full region in the northern side led to red dyes being disposed of in the water which in turn colored the waters red.

It is also interesting to note the Red Creek Inn that was formed, incidentally by a local from the nearby area, in Henrietta that was in the nearby Rochester County. This in which went to become a restaurant and a nightclub gained much popularity in the eighties. However, today it cannot be found among the modern eateries and places in the same location where it used to be.